La Purísima Concepción

The day after we visited Santa Inés, we were lucky that the storm was almost over. We went to Lompoc to see  Mission La Purísima Concepción.  The  11th of the 21 Mission  was named for Mary, the mother of Jesus.  It was founded on December 8, 1787 by Father Fermin de Lasuén This  Mission was destroyed   by an earthquake in 1812 and rebuilt in a different site in 1813.  It was  rebuilt again between 1934-1942.  Today,  La Purísima Concepción  is  a State Historic Park  where volunteers demonstrate what mission life used to be. It has over 20 buildings   and is the most fully restored mission in California. Rooms are furnished as they would have been in the 1820’s.

It was- in my opinion- one of the best Mission we visited ( as we only had 2 more to see after that one). We were lucky to see some docents in  period costumes. We enjoyed it very much. The buildings, the garden,  the animals, the information, the nice lady in the gift shop and the exhibits in the Visitor center.

La Purísima Concepción  is a “living history” museum and  the site is used for reenactments. To share my visit the text will be short, I will rather let the pictures tell the story of what we saw.

I think you would also  enjoy  visiting this Mission. I hope you can go one day. Thank you for your visit and comment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mission Santa Inés

To share my visits of the Missions,  the text will be short, I will rather let the pictures tell the story of what we saw.

The architecture of the 21 Spanish Mission built along El Camino Real (1769-1823) reflects both the simple tastes of their Franciscan founders and the limited resources of material and skilled labor available. The missions were constructed of stone and adobe, finished inside and out with whitewashed mud plaster and topped with pitched roofs of hewn timber covered with red tile.

Located in beautiful rolling hills in the city of Solvang,  Santa Inés has been called the “Hidden Gem of the Missions.” It was founded  on September 17,1804. The 19th of the 21 Missions in California. It is named for Saint Agnes of Rome, a 13 year old roman girl martyred in A.D. 304. It is an active church, the responsibility of Capuchin Franciscans since 1924.

We arrived in Solvang with  heavy rain. I took the first photo through the window of the car. But it did not stop us to visit. My photos will tell more.

We really did not want to spend much time in the garden but we were happy with our visit.

After this visit,   there were only 3 more Missions for us to see  in California.

Thank you so much for reading and if you want to comment, you are welcome ! Have a great WE.

 

 

 

Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa

The very next day ( after visiting two  Missions) we visited another mission. more.      We were in San Luis Obispo  ( aka  SLO ). The Mission occupies a full city block in downtown  SLO. It is one of the few early missions never to be relocated. This mission is often called “The Prince of Missions ” and was named for a 13th century French saint, the Bishop of Toulouse.

This mission was the 5th  and was founded in September 1772 by Father Serra.          The present building was built between 1794  and 1794 and was restored in 1933.

It was built in an area known as La Cañada de Los Osos, the canyon of the Bears because of the concentration of grizzly bears in the area.  In the museum we find Indian artifacts, glassware, documents and pictures from days gone by. We enjoyed very much to see the garden with beautiful magnolia and some fruit trees.

The church was very nice with beautiful drawings on walls.

We have now only 4 more Missions to visit. Thanks for reading. and many thanks also for leaving a short comment.

 

Mission San Miguel

After visiting the Mission San Antonio de Padua, we drove to see the Mission San Miguel  Arcángel.  This was the 16th of the 21  California  Mission founded  on July 25, 1797.  It was named for The Archangel Michael.  The mission was very prosperous during the mission period with a large community of Native  Americans living nearby. The Mission  was fully restored after the earthquake of 2003. It was closed for a while but now   it  looks much as it was throughout most of its history.

To share my visits of the Missions,  the text will be short, I will rather let the pictures tell the story of what we saw.

Visiting a Spanish Mission is enjoyable.  Sometimes the gardens are beautiful or the museum is really interesting. They are all different. This one had a very good  museum with lots of information. The garden had 30 varieties of cactus, some roses and olive trees.

Inside the church we can see The EYE OF GOD shown in clouds representing heaven with divine rays. This is the largest and most beautiful GOD’S EYE in any of the California missions today. The center statue is St.Michael the  patron of the San Miguel church.

The interior of the church is one of the best preserved of all the mission.  Interesting drawings. Its wall and ceiling decorations  have never been repainted. On the photo above, to the left,  we see a large shell representing baptism- the only shell of this size in any of the California Missions.  The columns, copies of columns in the Forum of Rome, were done by  the artist Don Esteban Munras from Monterey. The outside lines are thinner than those in the middle giving a round look to them.

This Mission is called “The Mission on the Highway” as it is right there  by the road  (101)   and was  even there before there was a road !

As I said it was the 16th mission founded in California and for us it was  also the 16th mission we visited since the very first one (San Juan Capistrano) in March 2013.

Thanks for your visit . We have a few  more Missions to see on that trip…